Monthly Archives: July 2013

ARTIST PROFILE: Oliver Lewis

Our next Artist Profile from Border Collective falls on Oliver Lewis. We asked Ollie the same questions we asked Joseph on Wednesday to note the differing artistic patterns that occur within the same artistic collective. Here goes!

Ollie Lewis

Ollie Lewis

Who are your artistic inspirations?

Being a photographer that specialises in photomontage and constructed image I often find inspiration from the work of John Goto and Peter Kennard. I feel that they are the two of the leading names in modern photomontage. Anyone with interest in working with constructed image would do well to take note of these two names and styles of art.

Is there a specific message you intend to convey in your work? Are there any themes

It is important to incorporate a degree of communication in your work, I often do this by constructing my work to question the viewers relationship with the themes, this level of communication is most evident in my work, Throw-Away Society (T.A.S) and T.A.S pt2.

Consideration for the environment is at the heart of my practice, addressing the crucial choice between modern developments and the preservation of the natural world. I work under the assumption that man’s hand in the degradation and despoiling of the environment is unavoidable in the modern world, but how collectively it is down to man to reduce the lasting effects caused by everyday life.

Ollie Lewis

Ollie Lewis

Do you have any specific artistic/photographic methods? Are there any subjects you particularly enjoy documenting?

My work is primarily with constructed images, with this I aim to combine an informed opinion with, visual truths and statistics to produce work that holds the potential to question, inform and influence.

Do you have any specific patterns or routines you use in your work?

Being a very visual person I can only learn so much from academic resources, for this reason my work with constructed image often originates from street and documentary photography taken with the potential for further use in photomontage.

Ollie Lewis

Ollie Lewis

Do you have a favourite piece you have created?

My favorite piece of work I have created is my panorama from throw-away society pt1 the reasons for this are largely down to the time involved in producing this piece, it is created from 27 digital photographs 6 to create the panoramic background and the reaming 21 images of generic everyday activities used as a representation of the objects we often take for granted, taken under natural light in thier natural environment then joined in Photoshop.

What’s next for you in the future? Do you have any pending projects?

I have multiple pending projects including, work in progress Throw-Away Society Pt. 3 shelf life. (T.A.S)  Pt. 3 will question whether the products on our shelves are really made to last and whether they are destine for the landfill before they leave the production line.  There is also the potential for a second in the series Game of Power. Game of power – next gen, this will look closer at the future of energy consumption, and the key players involved.

Ollie Lewis - T.A.S pt 1

Ollie Lewis – T.A.S pt 1

Ollie’s work can be seen as part of Border Collective at The Strand Gallery between 16th – 21st July.

Further examples of Ollie’s work can be seen here.

ARTIST FEATURE: Jayne Worthington

One of the exhibited artists in Border Collective is photographer Jayne Worthington. We set one member of our team the task of researching the artist and the particular piece she is exhibiting with us, and putting together a critical analysis on the project from an outsider’s perspective. Here is what she found:

TIME PASSES. LISTEN. TIME PASSES.

Jayne Worthington

Jayne Worthington

Jayne Worthington’s Time Passes. Listen. Time Passes is her most conceptually ambitious project to date: claiming to question ‘perceived understandings of landscape’, especially ‘the notion[s] of freedom and escapism’ associated with it and even ‘the validity of her own personal approach’. In addition, these preoccupations further complicate the title’s rare significance. Thus, the distinguished modesty of these photographs, which depict vast and still rural spaces, is unexpected but alluring. In fact, the more we engage with the work – and perform its poetic demands – the more we appreciate the masterful delicacy of Worthington’s artistic approach.

Jayne Worthington

Jayne Worthington

Therefore, looking into these scenes;

Listen.

Time Passes.

Listen.

They become filled with ourselves;

Worthington asks us to animate this landscape and because of the absence of people, animals and movement in these simple, vacuous spaces, we can. In doing so, we realise that such imaginative appropriation of it is distinctly personal, inevitable, and insatiable. This materialises in the idiosyncrasies of these photographs, which, since a surprising number showcase the resplendence of the natural light and the sublime scope of the landscape, seem to acknowledge the temptation to accentuate its idyllic potential. However, she ensures that as we inevitably grasp at the landscape’s positive energy, our visual and imaginative flux is disrupted by the marks of human construction. It seems that our contribution to the landscape only undermines the ideals we ceaselessly propagate.

Jayne Worthington

Jayne Worthington

The collection’s success relies on Worthington’s subtle visual exploitation of the tensions she strives to address. She coaxes us into self-realisation by affronting us with the familiar in a startlingly static form, moreover exciting our interest in the negative potential of nature’s aesthetics to prove how ambiguous its promise actually is.

Jayne Worthington

Jayne Worthington

Written by Elizabeth Worby.

All images © Jayne Worthington.

Jayne’s work can be seen as part of Border Collective at The Strand Gallery between 16th – 21st July.

Further examples of Jayne’s practice can be seen here.

ARTIST PROFILE: Joseph Horton

As we officially open our doors to Border Collective, we want to introduce you to one of the exhibited artists, Joseph Horton, through a little Q&A session. We hope you find it as informative as we did!

Joseph Horton

Joseph Horton

Hi Joseph! So first off, who are your artistic inspirations?

Henri Cartier-Bresson, Richard Avedon, Edward Hopper.

Is there a specific message you intend to convey in your work? Are there any themes?

My work usually expresses a thought or an idea I have been deciphering in my head. It can involve people and their ideologies, my own idea towards an inevitability, or well-known philosophical and sociological problems. For me, my photographs are the equivalent to a mathematicians workings-out.

Joseph Horton

Joseph Horton

Do you have any specific photographic methods?

I work a lot at the moment with film as I feel it aids my work and the Romanticism I have attached to the medium.

Do you have any specific patterns or routines you use in your work?

Not really, my work fluctuates between interests and ideas and so ranges in subject a lot. However I feel there is always a hint of Romanticism throughout, as I like to create some narrative in my work. I also work a lot in square format but as my project ideas are developing I believe I’ll start to work 6×7 as well.

Joseph Horton

Joseph Horton

Do you have a favourite photograph you have captured?

Probably an image I did for the John Haider Building series. It’s a step in the direction that I’m becoming more and more interested in which is photographing people, the way they live and the ideologies they live by.

Joseph Horton - John Haider Building

Joseph Horton – John Haider Building

And finally, what’s next for you in the future? Any pending projects you can tell us about?

I have two portrait documentary projects I want to complete over the coming year while I move to continue my studies at London Westminster. However I don’t want to disclose much more as I’m still working on what I want them to portray.

Joseph Horton

Joseph Horton

All images © Joseph Horton.

Border Collective will be exhibiting their work at The Strand Gallery from 16th – 21st July.

Further examples of Joseph’s work can be seen here.

COMING UP: Border Collective

A group of ten Photography BA (Hons) students from Hereford College of Arts are set to exhibit their final year work at The Strand Gallery between the 16th – 21st July.

Coralie Datta

Coralie Datta

Their collective practice shows a diverse variety of work, reflective of photography today, from graphic, constructed intervention to more traditional forms of documentary photography and studio work. The variety not only reflects the diversity of current photographic practice, but also demonstrates the diversity of practice that is encouraged through the degree programme at Hereford College of Arts.

Ollie Lewis

“As aspiring artists and photographic professionals there is nothing better and simultaneously more nerve racking than putting on an exhibition in a Gallery,” said Alex Thimm, Course Leader of BA (Hons) Photography at Hereford College of Arts.

Jayne Worthington

Jayne Worthington

In a world where photographic images are increasingly placed and consumed on a screen, the gallery wall continues to create a unique and valuable challenge. To be seen, to be recognised, to be judged. To place their work at the mercy of the gallery visitor, especially in a cosmopolitan area such as London, shows the ambition and determination that young artists require these days to make their mark.

At Hereford College of Arts, we support the aspirations of talented students and hope to support them well after their studies with us.”

Joseph Horton

Joseph Horton

“At this early stage in our careers, the supportive and encouraging environment of the college and the staff is invaluable,” said Jayne Worthington. “We are really excited about embracing this opportunity and the hard work it involves!”

Sarah Marty

Sarah Marty

Hereford College of Art’s Border Collective will be on show at The Strand Gallery between the 16th and 21st July.

For more information about the exhibition, you can visit The Border Collective Blog.

LAST CHANCE TO BUY: Voices from Westminster

Lord Hume

Lord Hume

We’re now coming in to the last few days of our exhibition ‘Voices from Westminster‘ by John Stewart Farrier here at The Strand Gallery. If any of these fantastic shots have caught your eye for purchase then don’t hesitate to get in touch with the gallery at leila@proud.co.uk to request a catalogue and add one of these invaluable portraits to your personal collection.

Margaret Thatcher

Margaret Thatcher

Voices from Westminster ends Saturday 13th July, these really are the final days to catch it!

Email info@thestrandgallery.co.uk for further information.

Faces Around Westminster

To coincide with John Stewart Farrier’s Voices from Westminster here at The Strand Gallery, we have put together a mini-exhibition in our Print Sales Room. This mini-show has been put together from Proud’s permanent collection as a means of complementing yet questioning the works surrounding them.

Dorothy Bohm

Dorothy Bohm

Taking on Farrier’s political stance from within the walls of Parliament, this mini show is focusing on the broader spectrum of the city’s social stance around the Westminster area.

Ken Russell

Ken Russell

Calling on images from classic London settings, we are exploring a similar candid style that Farrier shows throughout Voices from Westminster, while maintaining a contrasting view of subject matter.

Dorothy Bohm

Dorothy Bohm

These classic London prints will be on show in our Print Sales Room for the duration of the accompanying exhibition. The images chosen focus on the broader spectrum of the public surroundings of Westminster, contrasted with the private interiors of Farrier’s images.

Ken Russell

Ken Russell

All images © Dorothy Bohm and © Ken Russell

Voices from Westminster can be seen at the Strand Gallery until 13th July.

WESTMINSTER FEATURE: Government Art Collection

To coincide with our current Voices from Westminster  exhibition by John stewart Farrier here at The Strand Gallery, we want to explore the recurring theme of art and politics that is portrayed through Ferrier’s portraits – a theme we haven’t really touched upon before. One member of the team pitched the idea of a feature on Government art collecting, and we wanted them to run free with the concept. So here goes:

Today, the Government Art Collection is one of the most important collections in British art, bringing together pieces dating from the 16th century to the present day. It was in fact the rising costs of decoration in 1898 which motivated officials to use artwork to cover the walls and start the collection, which currently stands at over 13,500 paintings and sculptures, highlighting the importance of art to the Government today.

Idris Khan - Bach... Six Suites for the Solo Cello

Idris Khan – Bach… Six Suites for the Solo Cello

Art is selected for the Government Art Collection with the help of an advisory committee, who choose works from artists who have a strong British connection. The placement of art works in government buildings and embassies is also based on a piece’s connection to a location. For example, to mark Ireland’s Presidency of the Council of the European Union, pieces were chosen from across European member states to exhibit, with the Farmleigh Gallery in Dublin acquiring Idris Khan’s “Bach … Six Suites for the Solo Cello” until the end of June.

L.S. Lowry - Lancashire Fair: Good Friday, Daisy Nook

L.S. Lowry – Lancashire Fair: Good Friday, Daisy Nook

Works from the Collection are displayed in the offices and reception rooms of several hundred major British Government buildings in the United Kingdom and around the world. Thousands of people visit these buildings every year and therefore the works of art themselves play a vital role in helping to promote British art and artists.

A conservator at work on location in 10 Downing Street © Crown Copyright

A conservator at work on location in 10 Downing Street
© Crown Copyright

Written by Stephanie Jenkins.

Voices from Westminster by John Stewart Ferrier can be seen at The Strand Gallery between 3rd – 13th July.

All images © Government Art Collection.

SPOTLIGHT: Gemma Gallagher

Our current exhibition, Voices from Westminster, features photographs taken of various politicians within the walls of Westminster by John Stewart Farrier. The general theme behind this exhibition is one of art about politics; the artist Gemma Gallagher demonstrates how art does not have to be confined to this by representing environments which have been shaped by politically motivated situations, and the harsh realities of war.

Gemma Gallagher

Gemma Gallagher

The exhibition, ‘A Troubled Romance’ is an exploration of romanticism in relation to violence and war, derived from Gallagher’s experience growing up in a divided society within the socio-political situations in Northern Ireland. Her aim was to consider the complexities of what drives people and politicians to war, and examine alternative perspectives of political conflict: the subjective and objective, the romance and the reality.

Gemma Gallagher

Gemma Gallagher

Gallagher’s work is political, yet not in the sense that she is attempting to make a political statement, or creating something to influence the viewer’s political opinion. She simply made it because it is an issue and a conflict that she is personally affected by, commenting “you cannot live and breathe in a society which has had 30 years of politically motivated violence without it having some kind of impact on you”.

The romance in her work is influenced by the history of her country, be it through storytelling and poetry, or folk songs and street murals. The romance that attaches people to war and struggle is apparent through these and she, like many others, cannot help but view her country’s history as romantic, to see sacrifices as heroic – regardless of political stance. The character of romantic hero is one which has grown out of reading poetry by Yeats, where negative charges against the revolutionaries are balanced with a more romantically heroic description, a balance which she strives to portray visually through her paintings.

Gemma Gallagher

Gemma Gallagher

A series of contrasts are presented to the viewer through both the imagery used and the physical material of the work. The use of expressive painterly marks contrasts starkly with the factual printed image. An imagined, attractive, almost ideal world is interrupted with mechanical aesthetics which represent the conflict between perspectives.

Gemma Gallagher

Gemma Gallagher

Gallagher does not view her work as overtly political in as much that she is not seeking to support the opinions of a political party or even convey a particular political stance, the aim is to evaluate the romanticism people feel towards these situations. She says that she references Northern Ireland subtly through the titles of her work to make it visually transferable to any country, a feeling which is especially relevant at this time.

Gemma is currently working on a series of drawings and photographs inspired by visits to Cambodia, and how the country’s tragic history is intertwined with mythology and the spiritual history and culture of the country.

Gemma Gallagher

Gemma Gallagher

All images © Gemma Gallagher

Written by Stephanie Jenkins.

Our current exhibition, Voices from Westminster by John Stewart Farrier can be seen at The Strand Gallery between 3rd – 13th July.

Further examples of Gemma’s work can be seen here.

COMING UP: Voices From Westminster

The Strand Gallery is proud to present Voices from Westminster, a collection of political portraits taken by documentary photographer John Stewart Farrier. Sumptuous black and white photographs taken during, but not exclusive to, Thatcher’s reign; this collection includes images of Harold Wilson, Enoch Powell, Jeffery Archer, Denis Healey, Quentin Hogg, Roy Jenkins, Shirley Williams and many more.

Enoch Powell

Enoch Powell

This fascinating portfolio showcases a host of notable (and some controversial) political figures and offers a rare glimpse inside the walls of Westminster. Including previous Prime Ministers Alec Douglas-Home, Harold Wilson, James Callaghan, Margaret Thatcher and Garret Fitzgerald, Farrier’s collection shows eminent political figures as they are rarely seen; relaxing in their homes, reading papers at their desks and socialising at private events.

Margaret Thatcher

Margaret Thatcher

John’s ability to capture his sitters at their most comfortable is evident in the charming results on display at The Strand Gallery; some subjects chuckling at the camera, others playing up to their media stereotypes, and in some cases caught mid-gesture while enthusiastically recounting their time in the cabinet. Callaghan has famously boasted of his own portrait, “the art is John Farrier’s, the warts are mine!”

Jeffrey Archer

Jeffrey Archer

The Strand Gallery invites you to take a tour through the political history of Westminster. This summer, enjoy a unique opportunity to see various Voices from Westminster, past and present, all under one roof!

Lord Hume

Lord Hume

Voices from Westminster can be seen at The Strand Gallery between 3rd – 13th July.